Phases of Primary One Registration Exercise

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From 2012 onwards, the Ministry of Education (MOE) will implement measures to further differentiate between Singapore Citizens (SCs) and Permanent Residents (PRs) at the Primary One (P1) Registration Exercise. When balloting is necessary in a specific phase, SCs will be given absolute priority over PRs. SCs and PRs will continue to be eligible for the same phases, and all applicants will be admitted if the total number of applicants in any phase does not exceed the number of vacancies. However, if the number of applications exceeds the number of vacancies in a specific phase, SCs will be admitted first ahead of PRs, before home-school distance is considered.

Starting from the 2014 Primary One (P1) Registration Exercise, the Ministry of Education (MOE) will reserve 40 places in every primary school for registrants in Phase 2B and 2C (20 places for each phase) to ensure continued open access to all primary schools.

From the 2015 Primary One Registration Exercise, a child who gains priority admission into a school through his/her distance category is required to reside at the address used for registration for at least 30 months from the commencement of the P1 registration exercise.

From the 2018 Primary One Registration Exercise, children attending MOE kindergartens situated within primary school compounds will be eligible to register under Phase 2A2 of those schools.

The 2020 registration exercise was done online. Parents should ensure that their SingPass account is valid and the 2-Step Verification done before the Primary 1 registration exercise starts. From this year MOE will be introducing a cap on the intake of children of permanent residents.

Category 1: Children who are Singapore Citizens or Singapore Permanent Residents

Phase 1

For a child who has a sibling studying in a school of choice. All children registered under this phase will be given places in schools.

Phase 2A1

For a child whose parent is a former student of the school and who has joined the alumni association as a member not later than the cut off date for that year; or whose parent is a member of the School Advisory/Management Committee.

Phase 2A2

For a child whose parent or sibling has studied in the school of choice; or whose parent is a staff member of the school of choice.

Phase 2B

For a child whose parent has joined the school as a parent volunteer not later than the cut off date for that year and has given at least 40 hours of voluntary service to the school by the cut off date for that year; or whose parent is a member endorsed by the church/clan directly connected with the school; or whose parent is endorsed as an active community leader. Schools that balloted during Phase 2B registration.

Phase 2C

For a child who is ineligible for or unsuccessful in earlier phases. Schools that balloted during Phase 2C registration.

Phase 2C Supplementary

For a child who is unsuccessful in gaining a place in a school of choice at Phase 2C. Schools with Phase 2C supplementary vacancies.

fiber_new Schools that balloted from Phase 2A1 to 2C supplementary lock_open Includes details like balloting for 1km, 2km, Singaporean or PR etc. From 2019 Primary One Registration exercise only

Notes:

  • Priority admission to a P1 place in a school will be given to children in this order:
    1. Singapore Citizens (SC) living within 1km of the school.
    2. SC living between 1km and 2km of the school.
    3. SC living outside 2km of the school.
    4. Permanent Residents (PRs) living within 1km of the school.
    5. PRs living between 1km and 2km of the school.
    6. PR living outside 2km of the school.
  • Should the number of applications exceed the number of vacancies in any phase, places will be balloted according to the following examples:
    1. School A has 80 places, but 95 registrants. The 95 registrants are divided into Singapore Citizens (SC), Permanent Residents (PR), and the distances between their schools and homes.

      Distance to schoolSC registrantsPR registrants
      Within 1km60 (admitted)10 (balloting required)
      1km to 2km10 (admitted)10 (unsuccessful)
      Over 2km5 (admitted)0
      Total7520

      All 75 SCs will be admitted first. The remaining 5 vacancies will be allocated to the PRs based on their distance to school. In this case, the 10 PRs living within 1km from the school will ballot for the 5 remaining places.

    2. School A has 70 places, but 85 registrants. The 85 registrants are divided into Singapore Citizens (SC), Permanent Residents (PR), and the distances between their schools and homes.

      Distance to schoolSC registrantsPR registrants
      Within 1km40 (admitted)5 (unsuccessful)
      1km to 2km24 (admitted)9 (unsuccessful)
      Over 2km7 (balloting required)0
      Total7114

      All SCs within 1km and between 1km and 2km will be admitted first (total 64). After that, SCs living outside 2km will be considered. With only 6 places remaining, the 7 SCs living beyond 2km will have to ballot for them. All PRs will not be able to get a place in this phase.

  • At the end of Phase 2A(2), 50% of the remaining places will be allocated for phase 2B and the other 50% for Phase 2C registrants in a school. In the event that less than 50% of the allocated vacancies are taken up at Phase 2B, the remaining vacancies will be carried forward to Phase 2C.

Category 2: Children who are neither Singapore Citizens nor Singapore Permanent Residents

Phase 3

For a child who is neither a Singapore Citizen nor a Permanent Resident.

Children who are Singapore Citizens or Singapore Permanent Residents and who have not registered at any of the earlier phases are also eligible to register at this phase. Registration in this phase will be done on a first-come-first-served basis.

Schools with Phase 3 vacancies.

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